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06 Sep Yes You Can Refile Your Chapter 13 Case, But Should You?

If you are facing a foreclosure, vehicle repossession, wage garnishment or other financial crisis, Chapter 13 bankruptcy can be a great tool to stop the chaos.  As the type of bankruptcy that includes a repayment plan, Chapter 13 can empower you to reduce your monthly payments, eliminate accruing interest on credit card debt, reduce your total indebtedness - all while protecting your real and personal property from creditor actions.If you are facing a foreclosure, vehicle repossession, wage garnishment or other financial crisis, Chapter 13 bankruptcy can be a great tool to stop the chaos.  As the type of bankruptcy that includes a repayment plan, Chapter 13 can empower you to reduce your monthly payments, eliminate accruing interest on credit card debt, reduce your total indebtedness - all while protecting your real and personal property from creditor actions. When Chapter 13 plans work, they can literally be life changing and every experienced bankruptcy attorney can recount stories of grateful clients who successfully completed their Chapter 13 plans with property intact and debt gone. Unfortunately, however, most Chapter 13 plans fail before completion - in some jurisdictions the failure rate is 65% or higher.  Often repayment plans fail not because of bad faith on the part of debtors or even because of unrealistic budgeting.
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06 Jun How Bankruptcy Can Solve Your “Too Expensive Car” Problem

Next to home mortgages, motor vehicle loans are often your most expensive purchase. According to USA Today, the average transaction cost of a new car or truck sold in the U.S. was around $33,500. Lenders are now extending vehicle purchase loans to 6 years or longer, and when interest rates are factored in, you can easily find yourself responsible for $40,000, $50,000 or more. Unlike real estate purchases, motor vehicles are depreciating assets. If you finance your car or truck over 4 to 6 years, there is a good chance that you will owe more on your vehicle until year 3 or 4 of your contract. This means that in the event of a financial crises such as an illness or job layoff, you won’t be able to eliminate your financial obligations by selling your vehicle. If you “roll over” your loan into a new loan for a less expensive car, you’ll just delay your day of reckoning because you will end up owing far more on the less expensive car than it will ever be worth. Further, your installment payment is not your only vehicle expense. Insurance costs can rise quickly and unexpectedly if you or a family member has an accident. Routine maintenance and service such as new tires and brakes can add to your cost of ownership.
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19 May Why I Prefer Chapter 7 Bankruptcy to Chapter 13 Debt Consolidation

Most folks considering bankruptcy will consider two options - Chapter 7 and Chapter 13. Sometimes, you have the option of choosing either type of bankruptcy, whereas in other situations you would only be eligible to file either a Chapter 7 or a Chapter 13. When I meet with a client, I always start with the question of how can I fit this person into Chapter 7. It is not always possible, but, in my experience my Chapter 7 just works better - my clients get their discharge that wipes out debt completely, their cases are over in about 5 months, credit rebuilding can start within a year and the cost of bankruptcy is about 25% of the cost of Chapter 13.
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